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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Went to Indiana today and picked up my new project. A model 42 plow for my 110. When we picked it up today it was in one piece, and not a single thing moved on it. But, nothing my Dad and I couldn't handle...except for the main pivot pin that allows the blade to angle. That thing is STUCK. We are going to see if the local machine shop can give us a hand getting it out. After that, it is off to the sodablasting shop. I am also in the process of fabricating a MiniHomsteader inspired rear weight bracket. I saw his in a post and thought it was awesome, and wanted one very badly haha.

In the meantime, while the plow is in progress, I will still be using my Grandpa's old steel snow shovel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is it going to be for show or use?
I plan on using it. But, I'm not so sure it's actually going to be usable now. That stuck pin really won't come out. The machinist put it in his hydraulic press with 25 tons of pressure on it and it didn't budge. I'm going to have to figure out a plan B.
 

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Did you try heating the pin with a torch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Did you try heating the pin with a torch?
I don't own a good set of torches. I expected that the machinist would heat it before putting it into the press, but when I asked him he said no. I'm bringing it back to him Monday and he's going to heat it this time. I think he must have been in a hurry.
 

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Yes that's very good advice, I've often had good luck with Aerokroil solvent spray which the company claims chemically reacts with rust to dissolve it. It's worked better for me than almost anyhing else I've tried after letting it soak for a day or two before trying to use my hydraulic press or applying heat. It's a great product and may be worth a try. Another trick is to soak it with a 50/50 mix of acetone and automatic transmission fluid. As a last resort have your machinist carefully center it up in a milling machine and drill, ream, or bore it out and make a new pin to fit, but try the creeping oils first. There's always a way so don't give up. Good luck and let us know what works out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes that's very good advice, I've often had good luck with Aerokroil solvent spray which the company claims chemically reacts with rust to dissolve it. It's worked better for me than almost anyhing else I've tried after letting it soak for a day or two before trying to use my hydraulic press or applying heat. It's a great product and may be worth a try. Another trick is to soak it with a 50/50 mix of acetone and automatic transmission fluid. As a last resort have your machinist carefully center it up in a milling machine and drill, ream, or bore it out and make a new pin to fit, but try the creeping oils first. There's always a way so don't give up. Good luck and let us know what works out.
I like how in your post you say "There's always a way." Not everyone thinks like this, but the best mechanics I know have always had this mentality towards jobs. My Grandpa, a printing press installer and mechanic, had this mentality. I try my best to think the same! A friend of my father's has a hydraulic press and an auto shop. I talked to him about it today and he said, "Oh, we will get that pin out no problem." So sometime this week we are going to take a crack at it after some soaking and heat.
 

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Glad you're sharing the same positive attitude and are determined to 'git 'r done'. We all run into some tough challenges when it comes to projects such as these and I like to think of it as part of the journey toward completion whether its a restoration or just to get something fixed or running. We all share a love of John Deeres such as these and it's definitely worth the time and trouble and great to be able to preserve these well built pieces of John Deere history. You sound well on the way of getting that stuck pin out. The pre soaking with creaping oil and heat should definitely help. Just do your best to set up good support as close as possible around the diameter of the pin when its in the hydraulic press to be able to avoid bending or distortion of other brackets or parts. I'm sure the friend of your father who has the press will know what to do. Just some words for the wise to keep in mind. Again good luck on it and with continued progress with your project. My welcome to you also to this great web site.
Thanks,
Kerry.
 

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One other thought I had. Before you get that plow all fixed and shined up, you might want to get a second set of rear wheels wrapped in turf tires (if you don’t already have a pair). Ag tires aren’t good in wet snow. Turfs with chains are way better. And fill them with your choice of liquid ballast. I run 8.50” wide turfs filled with old antifreeze along with a pair of wheel weights plus the rack with 4 weights. Now I never used a plow since my 112 came with a blower and it’s way easier to just wait till the snowing is done, but it is a beast weighted like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm not too thrilled about how these brackets from eBay are fitting. The bottom of the bracket is 1/8" away from touching the tractor frame. I am thinking it is supposed to rest against it for extra support. What do you guys think? Will this work? View attachment 9005
Glad you're sharing the same positive attitude and are determined to 'git 'r done'. We all run into some tough challenges when it comes to projects such as these and I like to think of it as part of the journey toward completion whether its a restoration or just to get something fixed or running. We all share a love of John Deeres such as these and it's definitely worth the time and trouble and great to be able to preserve these well built pieces of John Deere history. You sound well on the way of getting that stuck pin out. The pre soaking with creaping oil and heat should definitely help. Just do your best to set up good support as close as possible around the diameter of the pin when its in the hydraulic press to be able to avoid bending or distortion of other brackets or parts. I'm sure the friend of your father who has the press will know what to do. Just some words for the wise to keep in mind. Again good luck on it and with continued progress with your project. My welcome to you also to this great web site.
Thanks,
Kerry.
Thanks for the kind words, Kerry! And I have to agree, these old machines sure are built well and they are great pieces of American history.

And now some good news for all of those wondering...THE PIN IS OUT! We didn't do any damage in the process either. I was surprised to see there are no bushings or grease fittings on this old setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
One other thought I had. Before you get that plow all fixed and shined up, you might want to get a second set of rear wheels wrapped in turf tires (if you don’t already have a pair). Ag tires aren’t good in wet snow. Turfs with chains are way better. And fill them with your choice of liquid ballast. I run 8.50” wide turfs filled with old antifreeze along with a pair of wheel weights plus the rack with 4 weights. Now I never used a plow since my 112 came with a blower and it’s way easier to just wait till the snowing is done, but it is a beast weighted like that.
It's funny you mentioned the turf tires in snow, because I've used ags before and they seem to spin out alot. At work we have a newer JD x738 that has turfs with no chains and the thing is a beast. It does have 4wd though. I am going to look at some tires, but probably won't buy them for a little while. I bought the ags because I thought it looked cool haha.
 

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I'm not too thrilled about how these brackets from eBay are fitting. The bottom of the bracket is 1/8" away from touching the tractor frame. I am thinking it is supposed to rest against it for extra support. What do you guys think? Will this work? View attachment 9005

Thanks for the kind words, Kerry! And I have to agree, these old machines sure are built well and they are great pieces of American history.

And now some good news for all of those wondering...THE PIN IS OUT! We didn't do any damage in the process either. I was surprised to see there are no bushings or grease fittings on this old setup.

Good work on conquering that stuck pin Brian. Your determination and persistence definitely paid off. The turf tires are definitely good advice for plowing along with the added weights and ballast. I had turfs on my 110 back in the day when I did some snow blowing back in Wisconsin. I only had chains and some make shift weights but did ok with it since the snow was only about a foot deep.
 

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We have several of those 700 series at the Hospital
and they go thru anything with no chains the
4 wheel drive with the nobby style factory tires
perform very well
My 235 has chains with turfs and does great on most days except for that last thrashing from Mother Nature
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
11124


Here's the new rear weight bracket! Big thanks to MiniHomesteader for providing the idea in one of the pics he posted. Hope you don't mind me copying your idea, Mini.

A friend of mine, Will, is an excellent fabricator, and he did all of the work on this one. All I did was draw up a 3 view plan, buy the steel, and send it his way. He even went a step beyond my request and painted it for me. It came out better than I thought. HUGE thanks to Will for all of his hard work here even though nobody here knows him haha. "Give credit where credit is due."
 
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