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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi to all, I'm a new member and glad to join you. I've been wanting to join for quite a while and finally came up with a name, signed up, and look forward to your help with info and enjoying contact with fellow John Deere enthusiasts. I have a family history with John Deere since my Dad had a dealership in Wisconsin in the '40s and '50's, was a good mechanic and had a collection of tractors spanning a '29 GP wide tread to 1950s models. We had a new 110 in '66 back then but sold it when we moved to California. I found a '66 110 earlier this year on Ebay, almost all original but needing work and restoration is now well under way. The photo with my member name is when I first hauled it home. I spent a good deal of time designing and fabing sturdy mounting brackets and its now mounted between two engine stands 18" off the floor allowing me to rotate it 360 degrees like stands in John Deere service manuals, a big help in making it easier to work on.

I'm sure I'll have lots of questions as I go along with restoration that I'd appreciate having your thoughts and input. One of the first is paint. I can't get Tallmans spray paint out here since Tallmans told me they can't ship to California due to Cal air resources board restrictions. I can use Rustoleum John Deere green and yellow or Krylon John Deere green or yellow, readily available. My test spray samples show a slight difference in the green. I used the Rustoleum yellow on my engine stand brackets and like that as the yellow. I believe I read an earlier thread stating that there was a change in John Deere green at some point but can't find that thread right now. I plan a good quality restoration but don't need to make it a show winner. I'll be painting almost the whole 110. The transmission which works fine so I don't need to rebuild it for now and won't be removing it. I'll be rebuilding the 8 h.p. Kohler since its very low on compression, has a slight knock, but amazingly wasn't burning oil, the spark plug was a good normal tan color. I'd appreciate your opinions on paint options, thanks in advance for your help and thanks for making this great web site available.
Thanks much, Kerry, HD-JD110fan.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks very much for the welcome and for the compliments. Your John Deere is certainly a fine looking machine and it looks well prepared for winter with the snow blower and a wagon load of fire wood to boot. I have a lot of fond memories of mowing lawns in the summer and blowing snow in winters in Wisconsin. It helped pay for the 110 back then. I have an L110 I bought new in 2003 I use for mowing. Once I get my '66 rebuild & restoration done I'll use it for mowing and will be selling the L110 which still runs great and only has 265 hours on it since new. The engine stand mounts I made took a couple of months to design and build but I felt the time was worth it since I had the heavy duty rotating engine stand. Having my own well equipped workshop helps a lot. I'm able to make special tools as needed and recently made a variator drive spanner wrench, muffler removal wrench, and I'm making a flywheel puller and also a steering wheel puller. I'll post some photos as I go along. It'll take me a while to get used to sending responses correctly & I hope this goes out ok. I'm only used to emailing and not to chat room type sites. I'll appreciate pointers on using the site and certainly restoration advice from the wealth of knowledge you fellows hold collectively. Thanks very much for your response Chaser, I really appreciate it, Kerry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Welcome aboard. Your garden tractor rotisserie is an awesome idea. That would come in extremely handy.
Hi ckjakline, Thanks for your comment and for getting in touch. The JD rotissery brackets took a while to design & build but are indeed handy and make it easy to acess any side. The JD 110 service manual I have had pictures of a service stand made by a company called Owatonna. Couldn't get much detail on the mounting brackets from the photos so I had to design my own. They're probably overkill design wise but I wanted to make them good & strong, better safe than sorry, hurt, or worse. My restoration is now well underway, a lot of cleaning, dis assembly, rust removal, parts inspection to see what needs to be rebuilt before painting. I'm taking lots of photos for assembly reference since this is my first tjme doing a 110 & have a lot to learn to be able to do things right. I'll post more photos as I go along. Thanks much.
 

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Welcome to the site, nice to have some new blood here the sight has been dyeing off slowly.
I am watching with much anticipation your project,
as that set up you have built is very well done. One Question if I may how did you get the tractor lifted up in the air once mounted to the brackets?
The 66 also looks to be in very good shape and a great find.
Very sorry top hear about your paint issues as I am a big Tallmans believer in their green and not so much in the Rustoleum green.
The Tallmans yellow has not been to my liking still believe in Mother Deere for that one but the price hurts.
I also have a 66 that's partially restored with a snow blower mounted on it.
Thanks again for posting keep the pictures coming as we really like those and I wish you good luck with your project.
So in the one pic there appears to be an HD hidden under that plastic. A sporty perhaps? Would love to see that pic if you have a chance.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Hello and I'm really pleased to hear from you and was hoping I would and thanks much for the welcome. You're one of the long time members of the site and rightly looked up to bymany others. I've seen many of your posts and you've always been a big benefit to all with so much valuable information. I know I'll have plenty of questions as I go along with my project and look forward to the great source of info this site provides. I hope it keeps going for generations to come. I'm still not up to speed navigating this web site so I hope everyone will be patient until I get more things figured out. I've also seen the Weekend Freedom Machine site and have been wondering if a lot of you guys are also on that site.
Regarding my mounting brackets for the 'JD rotisserie', I spent a long time trying to decide if I really wanted to take the time to design & build these and probably delayed the start of my restoration a long time as a result. I finally went for it and put the time in and since I had an engine stand capable of 360 degree rotation I'm now glad I did since it's definitely making work easier. Getting it up on the stands was a challenge in itself and took some good careful planning. I used a cherry picker a good friend of mine generously lent me and got some strong lifting straps on Ebay for the job. His cherry picker also had a load leveler which helped a lot. It still was a time consuming task because the legs of the picker interfere with the connecting tube joining the 2 engine stands. I bought some additional square tubing to make shorter legs which worked out but had to be careful of the tendency to tip. My son & I got the lift points finally worked out and got it mounted but the whole process took us a couple of hours. The cherry picker can be seen in the background of the last photo in the group of photos I first posted. A chain hoist and overhead lift set up would have been the easier way to go but the cherry picker was available and we 'gottr done'.
I was looking for '66 110 for a long time like the one I had 'back in the day' and finally found this one on Ebay. I was fortunate to find one so complete and nearly all original except for a few details, even had what looks like the original Firestone Traction Turf & Garden tires though the fronts are pretty bald. Probably won't be able to find good front replacements so I'll probably get a complete set of Carlisle high flotation tires, always like the look of those a little better anyway. The Kohler is real low on compression and will get an overhaul soon though it surprisingly wasn't burning oil, the spark plug is a nice normal tan color. My trans seemed to shift fine so I won't be removing it at this time. I'm thoroughly cleaning the 110 & removing most linkage to inspect & repair as necessary and will prime & paint the whole 110 over time. The hood needs fiberglass work which is something I haven't done much of and will take some time. I'm going through the variator and installing a new needle bearing. I made my own spanner wrench to dis assemble the variator, it would be hard to do without it. Seemed to be a much better way to go than using 2 punches & pry bar like the JD service manual showed. I also made a muffler pipe nipple/split clamp type/removal wrench which worked great. Learned the hard way on that one, tried to remove the muffler with a strap wrench and only accomplished putting a small dent in it. I have a plan for removing the dent which isn't too bad and hopefully I can save the muffler otherwise I'll get one from Hapco. I'm also currently machining my own steering wheel puller and flywheel puller so plenty to keep me busy with this project. Hoping to finish it by next summer but that's a pretty tall order. I bought an L110 new in 2003, has only 265 hrs on it, runs great & will be selling it once the 110 is ready. I'll kind of miss the convenience of the hydrostatic but I mow for fun and can't wait to have a 'new' 110 round fender again.
I do wish I could get Tallmans paint but CA restricts a lot of products you guys get to enjoy back east. I used Rustoleum on my Harley trailer years ago and its held up well. I know what you mean about Mother Deere's paint, really great paint but it takes awfully deep pockets. I haven't used Krylon, some reviews say its more scratch resistant than Rustoleum and I'm a bit undecided but may go with the Rustoleum yet, not quite sure. I'm open to all opinions on paint and would like to hear from anyone who would like to post info but I'll need to decide soon.

The Harley in the background under the plastic is a 1954 KHRTT 55 cu. in. flat head racer I restored, the rarest of its breed. Had to build that one from the ground up starting with a bare set of engine cases over a 35 year span starting in 1981 & finishing in 2016. I'll send you some photos of it soon, I see you're also a Harley fan.
Please forgive my getting so wordy with this reply but I'm really enthusiastic about restoring my 110 and will post more photos soon of work that's been done.

Thanks much again for your post for me. I look forward to hopefully hearing from many more fellow JD enthusiasts and know I'll benefit greatly from the vast collective knowledge that this great web site provides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Some progress I can report on my '66 John Deere 110 restoration: I began the clean up of my 110 shortly after I got it mounted on my rotating stands concentrating first on the underside which had a heavy multi year coating of oil encrusted dirt. I spent many hours scraping and brushing and although I could have pressure washed it I preferred not to get water into places where it could do harm and also to avoid a big mess on my driveway or in my shop. I've included some photos of the before and after to give an idea of where I'm at up to this point. There's still a good amount of thorough degreasing, rust removal, and paint removal before any serious paint prep can begin but at least I've got a fairly good start on the clean up. Along this part of the journey I machined some needed tools; a muffler removal wrench, a variator sheave spanner wrench, a steering wheel puller, and just finished a flywheel puller. I'll post some photos of those in a separate thread to keep the photo file more manageable to send. I had most of the material I needed to make these on hand in my shop and having the time to do the machining, wanted to make these to make the jobs easier and avoid any damage that I'd be sorry for later. As the old saying goes, "why is there never enough time to do it right but always enough time to do it over?" I guess we can all relate to that from at least one task or two that we've done in the past. I think this especially applies to the disassembly method for the variator pulley assembly shown in the John Deere shop manual. The photo shows using two punches with a pry bar in between to unscrew a sheave from the inner hub. I suppose this removal method does work but I didn't want to chance damaging the holes in the pulley or try using a hammer and punch and beat it to death which some claim will do the job. The spanner wrench was easy for me to make since I have a Bridgeport mill and is the right way to do the job in my book. I know not everyone has the luxury of a milling machine but a spanner wrench can still be made on a drill press if careful hole location is laid out on a piece of bar stock. I'm at the point where I can now pull the engine and do the tear down to see what it'll need and get parts ordered so I'll resume work toward paint later on. I'll be taking the variable speed, lift linkage, and steering linkage out of the tractor to inspect everything and make access to the frame easier for paint work. I'll try to post more photos as work goes along.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Found out where all my engine compression was going, YIKES!!

An update on my '66 JD 110 restoration. I've torn the engine down and found the cause of low compression, a burned exhaust valve. There was an unbelievable accumulation of dirt and debris under the engine shrouds around the cylinder and head fins rendering the cooling fins practically useless as the photos painfully reveal. No wonder the exhaust valve eventually overheated and burned yielding 'the old washing machine' performance it had when I bought it. The photo of the exhaust valve shows the valve head burned thin and uneven near the cylinder side. The pile of dirt in the photos was just what was removed from the cooling fins. Must have been many years in the making! Moral of the story, don't let your engine fins get this dirty... The good news for me is the engine was surprisingly not burning oil, the cylinder and crank are both in beautiful shape and are both standard although I can tell the valves were reworked at some point and not ground very square on the ends of the valve stems indicating a so so valve job. I've since gotten the engine torn down completely and will post more photos as work continues. My rebuild kit is on the way (Christmas present to myself, lol) so I've about turned the corner toward being near the re assembly stages. Thanks and Happy Holidays to All !!!
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah that was a grungy engine!
Yeah, its amazing what can be hiding under your engine shrouds. I only drove this 110 around my yard a couple of times before starting my restoration noting how low it was on compression. I'm just glad that the rest of the engine is in as good a shape as it is. I guess I was lucky too, to find a 110 still as close to original as this one is. Thanks and have a good weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah that was a grungy engine!
hot spots, lack of air flow to air cooled engine.................
devastating results. Easy fix thanks for sharing hope project is progressing
Yeah, the lack of cooling certainly took its toll on the exhaust valve. I'm lucky things weren't worse but amazingly most other parts are fortunately in good shape. My rebuild kit arrived and I'll be doing a careful and thorough rebuild. I have a John Deere factory 110 service manual and have downloaded the Kohler K181 factory service manual that they so graciously offer as a free download, both great info as well as all of the info Brian Miller has on his gardentractorpullingtips.com website. He offers exhaust valve rotator components which are a good idea to install as well. I'll be keeping busy with my engine rebuild for a while and look forward to this part of the restoration. Thanks and have a good weekend.
 
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