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Discussion Starter #22
NEED A WRNCH ON TOP AND BOTTOM OF THE TIE ROD ENDS OR WRENCH AND SOCKET.
ONE USUALLY DOES NOT WORK

BATTERY BOX LOOKS GREAT . NICE WORK:)
Thank you! That actually means a lot to me.

I got the front end off, and the rear end off, too. The frame has been cleaned with a degreaser, and I'll start sanding this weekend. There's quite a bit of rust where the pedestal was mounted. I'll post before and after photos when I have it painted.
 

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Looks great!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I’m continuing to pull parts from under the frame. The first photo shows the last part I removed; it’s rusty, dirty and a little greasy. The second photo shows something that appears to be a non-factory modification. I think that’s genuine
83B02C2B-96A0-4555-8649-A5C5114F9159.jpeg
071385D5-A450-4FA8-92D1-DCEE1CEF3B3E.jpeg
baling wire!
 

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It is frustrating until you find a way that works for you. The holes in the end are for sticking a punch or screwdriver into them and turning it. It would’ve been nice if they would’ve just put flats on the end so you could just use a ratchet and a socket...
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I have a couple of questions.

First, did any of you rebuild the Ross Steering Box on your Model 110's? How do you decide if it needs to be done or not?

Second, after adjusting the cam follower (I had about 1/4 turn of slop in the steering), is there a way to tell if the slop is gone? I don't think I'll know if I've gotten all or some of the slop out until I put it all back together.

There's some kind of band or tape around the steering column, about halfway down the shaft (see the photo). Is that original? Is there something that is placed there as a replacement?

Thanks.

IMG_2362.jpg
 

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I have a couple of questions.

First, did any of you rebuild the Ross Steering Box on your Model 110's? How do you decide if it needs to be done or not?

Second, after adjusting the cam follower (I had about 1/4 turn of slop in the steering), is there a way to tell if the slop is gone? I don't think I'll know if I've gotten all or some of the slop out until I put it all back together.

There's some kind of band or tape around the steering column, about halfway down the shaft (see the photo). Is that original? Is there something that is placed there as a replacement?

Thanks.

View attachment 8439

Very Nice job on your instrument panel and other parts you've posted as you progress with your restoration. I've continued to work on my '66 and have it stripped down to the bare frame, have all mechanical parts removed, and I'm close to being ready to get the frame painted. I got the cadmium parts back from my platers and I'll try to post some photos soon. Gotten slowed down quite a bit with helping my son with home remodeling almost every weekend since March.

Regarding the clutch over-ride assembly part #AM30671, my '66 110 also had the wire twisted around the hole in the end of the rod so like all the fellas are saying, that's the way JD did them. Adjusting this assembly takes a good amount of torque using a 3/16" punch since the spring as I'm sure you know is a really strong one. Lubing the cam slots helps make rotating it a bit easier.

My '66 had black electrical tape wrapped around the steering column also under the column strap/clamp. I've read in the JD service manual that this is what they did at assembly and also what likely needs to be done if a squeak has become noticeable near the steering column. When I first got my 110 the steering wheel had a good 2/3 or more play, way too much to please anyone. I was able to get rid of a great deal of the play by adjusting the tapered stud on the steering arm. I've since machined and heat treated a new tapered stud since the original had a broken screwdriver slot. I think someone had tried to unscrew it all the way out of the steering arm not knowing that it doesn't have threads all the way to the tapered end inside that you'd need to be able to completely unscrew it; then over torqued it and broke the slot. I've been tracing down other sources of steering wheel play and found several other points to check. Steering tie rod ball joints is one which you sound like you've already taken care of. Mine also had some stepped wear on the tapered cone of the steering pivot arm. After re machining the cone to clean up the wear, more play was gotten rid of. When I removed my Ross steering housing, the three bolts securing it were also loose creating play. I haven't gone completely through the internals yet but the book says check the worm gear for excessive wear and also the thrust bearings. The worm gear seems to be really sturdy though and a very well heat treated part so these should have a very long life. The JD service manual states that a slight drag should be felt in the mid point of the steering wheel's full range of movement and that this indicates proper adjustment of the taper stud on the steering arm of the Ross unit. This seems to be the recommended way to tell if all of the slop has been adjusted out of the steering unit. I hope this info helps and keep up the great work on your restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Very Nice job on your instrument panel and other parts you've posted as you progress with your restoration. I've continued to work on my '66 and have it stripped down to the bare frame, have all mechanical parts removed, and I'm close to being ready to get the frame painted. I got the cadmium parts back from my platers and I'll try to post some photos soon. Gotten slowed down quite a bit with helping my son with home remodeling almost every weekend since March.

Regarding the clutch over-ride assembly part #AM30671, my '66 110 also had the wire twisted around the hole in the end of the rod so like all the fellas are saying, that's the way JD did them. Adjusting this assembly takes a good amount of torque using a 3/16" punch since the spring as I'm sure you know is a really strong one. Lubing the cam slots helps make rotating it a bit easier.

My '66 had black electrical tape wrapped around the steering column also under the column strap/clamp. I've read in the JD service manual that this is what they did at assembly and also what likely needs to be done if a squeak has become noticeable near the steering column. When I first got my 110 the steering wheel had a good 2/3 or more play, way too much to please anyone. I was able to get rid of a great deal of the play by adjusting the tapered stud on the steering arm. I've since machined and heat treated a new tapered stud since the original had a broken screwdriver slot. I think someone had tried to unscrew it all the way out of the steering arm not knowing that it doesn't have threads all the way to the tapered end inside that you'd need to be able to completely unscrew it; then over torqued it and broke the slot. I've been tracing down other sources of steering wheel play and found several other points to check. Steering tie rod ball joints is one which you sound like you've already taken care of. Mine also had some stepped wear on the tapered cone of the steering pivot arm. After re machining the cone to clean up the wear, more play was gotten rid of. When I removed my Ross steering housing, the three bolts securing it were also loose creating play. I haven't gone completely through the internals yet but the book says check the worm gear for excessive wear and also the thrust bearings. The worm gear seems to be really sturdy though and a very well heat treated part so these should have a very long life. The JD service manual states that a slight drag should be felt in the mid point of the steering wheel's full range of movement and that this indicates proper adjustment of the taper stud on the steering arm of the Ross unit. This seems to be the recommended way to tell if all of the slop has been adjusted out of the steering unit. I hope this info helps and keep up the great work on your restoration.
Thank you for your reply! That is all helpful information.

I may not need to, but I may go ahead and order new bearings, etc. for the steering box, since they're available, not too expensive, and it's an easy rebuild. I'd like to open the steering box up to look at the condition of the tapered stud, and to clean out the old grease. Right now, it feels exactly like you described, where it's dragging just a bit at the midpoint.

The tape on my steering column appears to have fibers imbedded in it, like duct tape.

I look forward to seeing the photos of your newly plated parts.

Thank you, again.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Here are before and after photos of the pedestal and the frame of my '66 Model 110 restoration. Reassembly is coming along, but with the cooler temperatures we're experiencing, I've had to stop painting. I still have to spray clear coat on the hood, hood supports, and fenders. Plus, I need to paint the rear axles and transmission housing. But, it's time to take all of the completed parts to storage for the winter. I've been cluttering up my garage and basement since last April.
Frame Topside Before.jpg
Frame Topside After.JPG
Frame Underside Before 1.JPG
Frame Underside After.JPG
Pedestal Before.JPG
Pedestal After.JPG
 

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