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1966 Round Fender Tear Down - Variator Lever, Bearing, and Hub Removal

Discussion in 'JD Lawn & Garden Tractor Forum' started by Fergus McDaniel, Aug 3, 2020.

  1. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    Hello:

    Can someone explain to me how to remove the variator lever, bearing, and hub from a 1966 JD 110 Round Fender?

    I purchased a 1966 JD 110 Round Fender in April of this year. This is my first lawn and garden tractor restoration. What got me interested was TV shows like 'FantomWorks' and 'Overhaulin', where old cars are brought back to better than new condition. I don't have the space, the tools, or the skills to handle a project of that scale, but a vintage lawn tractor is something I think I can handle. I've been bringing parts home from my storage unit, and taking them down to bare metal. I've found a lot of rust and some pitting under the layers of paint, but nothing too bad. Media blasting has removed the rust. I had to fix a small crack in the front of the hood, and I've taken dents out of one of the hood supports, the grill, and one of the fenders, and I've used some filler where necessary. It's been fun, so far. I've given each part three coats of primer, and three coats of color. Clear coat will be added before reassembly. I'm gradually getting an entire tractor in the lower level of my house (see the attached photo). I've gotten everything removed on the top of the frame, except for the pedestal. I can't figure out how to remove the variator lever assembly.

    Can someone help me out with how that is done?

    Thank you.
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. MiniHomesteader

    MiniHomesteader Active Member

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    Do you have a manual? Check your “Conversation”.
     
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  3. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    I have both the Service Manual, and the Parts Manual. What I want to do is remove the Speed Control Lever, the Hub, and the Housing from the side of the Pedestal. I don't see anything in either manual that describes the steps required to remove or disassemble these parts. I don't want to start beating on the end of the shaft that is inside the housing, unless that's how the hub and the shaft are disconnected/disassembled.

    What am I missing?

    Thanks.
     
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  4. Kster526

    Kster526 Well-Known Member

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    roll pin on bottom to remove entire handle, to remove spring on the thumb button / button you push down to move handle it simply unscrews which sometimes can be a chore getting loose then you can remove spring and rod from inside of variator handle
     
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  5. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    Hello:

    First - Thank you for the reply.

    Second - I saw a photo of your '66 110 that you posted on a different thread - it looks so nice! Do you have a photo album posted somewhere of the restoration?

    Third - Was part of your reply cut off? What I'm seeing starts with 'roll pin on bottom to remove entire handle'. 'Roll pin' is another name for 'Spring Pin', so I think you're directing me to the Spring Pin, which is labeled as #21 on page 204 of the Service Manual, where Figure 20 shows an exploded view of the Variator Linkage Components. Per the exploded view, the Spring Pin is located inside the end of the Speed Control Shaft (labeled as #19), the end of which rests inside the Lever Hub (labeled as #30). I didn't notice a hole in the bottom of the Lever Hub, but maybe it is covered over with paint. I'll look closely at the bottom of the Lever Hub this weekend when I drive out to where I store the rest of my 110.

    Sorry if this is not a good question, but how do I access the Spring Pin? Is your reply telling me that the Speed Control Handle has to be disassembled to reach the top of the Spring Pin, so that it can be pushed out the bottom of the Lever Hub?

    Please let me know if I'm way off the mark, and it's not the Spring Pin I have to remove in order to remove the Speed Control assembly.

    Thanks, again.
     
  6. Hi Fergus,
    I see that you're restoring a '66 110 and I'm also in the process of restoring a '66. I now have mine disassembled down to the bare frame except for the trans which is ok and not needing any work right now. Kster526 is correct that you need to drive out the roll pin from the bottom of the variator handle hub casting and is leading you in the right direction. The hole for it may be covered with paint/dirt but you'll definitely find it there on the bottom of the lever hub casting . There's a 3/16" diameter roll pin that must be punched upward all the way into the lever hub casting Before you'll be able to remove the lever/handle. The roll pin is 1 1/4" long and the lever hub casting has enough of a hollow/void inside it to allow the roll pin to be punched all the way inside it. Be sure to use a good quality tool steel drift punch that's long enough and enough undersize to pass through a 3/16" diameter hole, only a few thousandths smaller is good but avoid using a pin punch any smaller than necessary. The roll pin in mine was in real tight and not easy to remove so you'll need a good heat treated pin punch to remove it. Also be careful to keep your pin punch well centered on the hole when driving it in. Once I got the pin driven through the hub I used a gear puller to remove the lever hub which also has a woodruff key for the variator shaft. The lift lever hub has no roll pin in it but I needed to pry it loose with 2 large screwdrivers and use a gear puller to remove mine.

    To remove the button for the variator or these lift lever shaft be sure to heat the end of the button with a propane torch before putting a lot of torque on it to unscrew it. These were Locktited on when assembled at the factory and if you don't preheat it you might break the end of the button spring rod off in the end of the button. You don't need to get it extremely hot to soften the Locktite but plenty warm. I planned on replacing both of my rubber handle grips so I removed both of these before heating the buttons. If you're needing to save your rubber grips take care of course when using the torch to heat the button and you'll want to shield them from the heat. I clamped my lever button in a bench vise with aluminum jaws right after I heated it and was able to unscrew the button easily after applying the heat.
    I hope this info helps and good luck with all of your restoration efforts. I'll be posting some photos of the present status of my teardown soon. I just dropped of a big batch of parts for my 110 for cadmium plating which I hope will be back by the end of the month. I can now finally get to work on paint prep work on my frame. It's a long term project for me including a full engine rebuild but I'm enjoying the journey and I hope you are enjoying your resto journey as well.
     
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  7. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    Thank you so much for your reply! The information will allow me to keep moving forward, hopefully without any breaking anything.

    I'm curious about the cadmium plating. I read up on it just a few moments ago, but I still have questions. Were many of the metal parts cadmium plated when they originally came from the factory? If so, which ones? I'm sure I burned through any plating that existed on the parts I've already sand blasted or ground the paint/rust off of (using poly-carbonite pads). As I type this, I'm wondering if I've missed an important step in the pre-paint preparation work? If so, it's too late now!

    Here's two more questions. I saw a post somewhere about pulling a roll pin by screwing a metal screw into the bottom of the hole, and using a slide hammer to pull the pin out. What do you think of this method vs. driving the pin up and out its hole? Would the speed control lever need to be taken apart if this method works?

    I've been working on my 110 for four months; I'm hoping to start the reassembly before winter. I'm located in Nebraska, and I can't count on many mild days once winter really gets started. Plus, the building where it's stored (an aircraft hangar) is not heated, not insulated, and there's too much space around me to heat.

    I, too, am enjoying this project. Once it's completed, I may take it to a couple of vintage tractor shows, or maybe I'll use it to pull a float in the neighborhood July 4th parade. What do you intend to use your restored 110 for? Is this your first restoration, or have you done others? I think many people who do one restoration can't stop there, and restore another. They're like potato chips - you can't stop at one. I think it would be fun to restore an old Case or Wheel Horse. But, one project at a time!

    Thanks again for the reply and information.
     
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  8. johndeereelfman

    johndeereelfman Member Staff Member

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    20200612_134032.jpg Working on a restoration myself....
     
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  9. Brandan Smoker

    Brandan Smoker Active Member

    Looking good, Troy. Is that a 3 speed 110?
     
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  10. johndeereelfman

    johndeereelfman Member Staff Member

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    Thanks Brandan. No, it's a four speed. I'm doing a '66 110H over for a customer. Frame is done and the motor is almost complete with just the starter/generator and hydraulic lift pieces to paint yet. Started working on the transmission the other weekend but after getting all of the paint removed, the drive hub and one axle seal started leaking so it looks like I'm going to be splitting the rear and replacing all of the seal while it's apart.
     
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  11. Brandan Smoker

    Brandan Smoker Active Member

    Sounds like a fun project! I have to split the transmission on the 1963 110 I just found a few weeks ago, 2nd gear is pretty loud on it.
     
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  12. Kster526

    Kster526 Well-Known Member

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    Troy it’s good to see you haven’t sold
    Off the herdand still enjoying them
     
  13. On the cad plating Fergus I'll try to make a list of those parts that I feel most confident about having been cad plated on my '66 originally by JD but I'm not in any way calling myself an expert on JD restorations and certainly not nearly as much as a lot of others in our group. This my first JD restoration but I restored 2 Harleys and got real familiar with cad plating prep and also doing parkerizing, a process which Harley did years ago for rust prevention on cycle parts. I have an original '66 110 owners manual and service manual and did my best to determine what was originally cad plated based on those photos and if I found evidence of plating under the heads of bolts or other parts when I did my disassembly. It's sometimes hard to pinpoint cad plating from black and white photos but cad plating usually appears lighter in color in those photos and then again some of those parts may have actually been just zinc plated originally. Zinc plating doesn't last near as long though so I have parts cadmium plated. I guess otherwise like the saying goes in John Deere crowds, 'when in doubt, paint it green'. When I finish my restoration I may only be able to attend an industrial and agricultural meet held twice a year at a museum in Vista, CA if we ever get past the covid 19 issue which has shut everything down. Other than that maybe a 4th of July parade. There aren't any tractor shows I know of in California so you easterners are more fortunate. I definitely look forward to using my 110 for mowing. I liked the full floating mower deck that I remember the '66 I had back then that I feel will do a better job of mowing than the 2003 L110 that I have now. The 17.5 h.p. my L110 has is overkill for just mowing anyway. On the idea of using a sheet metal screw and a slide hammer to remove a roll pin, it may work but I never treid this, probably depends on how tight the roll pin is in the hole and if the sheet metal screw grips it well enough. You can give it a try and if it does'nt work punch the pin through with a pin punch. Try not to expand the end of the roll pin too much though since I don't know if this may tend to make it tighter in the hole. Let us know how it goes. Thanks.
     
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  14. johndeereelfman

    johndeereelfman Member Staff Member

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    20200324_131206.jpg 20200324_131140.jpg

    Nothing sold yet Kyle, still in the organization stage. All tractors are down and all shelving has been eliminated. Will take a lot of time to go through each of them to make sure they are complete and running.
     
  15. Brandan Smoker

    Brandan Smoker Active Member



    Hey Troy,
    I just sent you an email. Let me know if you got it?
     
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  16. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    Hello:

    Thanks to the information you provided, I was able to remove the speed control and mower deck lift levers. I was also able to remove the steering wheel, so I was finally able to remove the pedestal from the frame. I got all the paint, the old hornets nest, oil, grease, and a lot of rust off of it this past weekend.

    I couldn't get the roll pin in the speed control lever hub casting to budge, so I drilled through it with a slightly smaller drill bit. Once I'd drilled thru the center of the pin, it was easy to tap out what was left. The gear puller did the job to remove both the speed control lever and the mower deck lift levers from their shafts.

    Next, I'm planning to remove the front and rear axle assemblies, and then I'll begin work on the frame. I may have 100% of the sanding and painting completed by the end of September. I regret not keeping a log of the hours I've spent on this project so far - it's probably many more hours than I realize. But, again, it's been a fun project, plus I've had each of my three (mostly) adult kids taking an interest in the project, and helping me when I've needed an extra set of hands. Pedestal 1.jpg
     
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  17. Kster526

    Kster526 Well-Known Member

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    wow that's taking it way down and starting over.
    the pins on the tag are removable if you want to they are a twist style rivet
    I've used a pair of vise grips lightly and been able to remove

    Troy looks like you sanded and buffed that one out.Great shine on there.
    Another Elfian project well done
    anything ever come of the sons RJ project
     
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  18. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    Is there a trick to loosening the nuts holding the tie rods to the steering arm?
    0BB9BDA6-3211-431A-829D-AAB7C258F95E.jpeg
     
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  19. Fergus McDaniel

    Fergus McDaniel New Member

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    Here’s are ‘before’ and ‘after’ photos of the battery box on my 1966 Model 110: 07EE6E3A-B15D-499A-A8AE-2C11203EDD18.jpeg A9B15103-3A8A-4312-A5DB-5D04106C490A.jpeg
     
  20. MiniHomesteader

    MiniHomesteader Active Member

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    You should be able to slide a wrench over the flats under the tie-rod to hold the stud, then loosen the nut.
     
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